Tag Archives: tropical

Thanksgiving Recipe Linky Love / Visiting Food Banks in the Land of Milk and Honey

Some fun Turkey Day links:

  1. 59 Cheap and Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes;
  2. Mark Bittman’s Mimimalist Thanksgiving (or, at least some of it) turkey and some sides, all under THREE hours;
  3. Food safety experts say the turkey can go from FREEZER to OVEN;
  4. Kaylyn’s Low Carb Thanksgiving/Leftovers Recipes; and
  5. Bryant Terry’s ecological Thanksgiving recipes*.

And of course -holiday-friendly  Dude, Where’s the Stove? recipes:

* I have such a book crush on Bryant Terry. I received a copy of his new hit, The Inspired Vegan – I’ll have to post a review once I’ve done more than just drool over the recipes!

In the spirit of gratitude, I thought I’d share what I’ve learned about food banks this year. My town has a hotline people can call to find out what food banks are open each day. And this year, I helped a few friends visit them. By help I mean – making a phone call and driving people around. Not much, but, something, right?  It turns out that one my friends never got any sort of help from family during a rough patch. Not a penny, not a can. Nothing. It meant the world to her that I picked her up in my car, waited in line with her, and visited the food bank a few times. I had no clue it made a difference.

So what are these food banks like? One local non-profit with an ecological bent distributes food to seniors who pay a small flat fee each year, to get a weekly grocery bag full of lettuce, carrots, mushrooms, potatoes and other  veggies that are a shade past their prime, as well as a loaf of bread, saving them from the trash heap. A church distributes twenty-pound sacks of onions, cauliflowers, potatoes, carrots, and other veggies as part of a USDA program. Another place shares a mixture of canned / packaged foods and some fresh veggies as part of a food distribution non-profit.

So, anyways, I am giving thanks, to anyone who has ever given food, money, time, anything to any of these food banks.  Thank you for helping people in their time of need. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! And may we all have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Photo credit: my friend who worked like crazy making turkey cake pops!

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Tropical Influenced Fruit Salad (major hit with no added sugar!)

Maybe I shouldn’t even tell you about this. When I served this, I saw my friends taking seconds and THIRDS. No lie!

The major work of this consists of the chopping, chopping, chopping. And removing the pith and peel from the oranges takes quite a while. Or maybe I’m just slow with the motor skills. And no, I don’t think a food processor is going to help you here.

Tropical Influenced Fruit Salad – I did it MY WAY!

  • 1 can of chopped pineapple, with juice;
  • 3 Gala or other sweetish apple (I’m sure Delicious varieties would work well too);
  • 6 Navel oranges;
  • 3 firmish bananas;
  • 1/4 cup of coconut milk; and
  • dashes of cinnamon.

Mix everything. And then chill. I think I garnished this with five or six latitudinal slices of the navel oranges.

I was actually planning on making my Grandma’s Cranberry Salad, but there were no fresh cranberries in the supermarket the day I went shopping. There are a few caveats with this salad. First, the more orange juice/pineapple juice you put in, the less time the salad will last.* I am guessing that something about the acids versus the coconut milk causes a breakdown in “vinaigrette” over time. So, this’ll probably last about 36 hours after making. Oh, also, my can of coconut milk had the floaty bits caked on one side. This meant that it wasn’t so much milk as a nearly-solid cream. This turned out to be a boon because it ultimately helped me control the moisture content. The clear coconut juice doesn’t add a lot (in my humble opinion) of flavor, so, I would not add it in.

Makes 20 servings – by this I mean, my seven or eight friends eating this kept getting more and more and more…enjoy!

Photo Credit: one of my happy diners!

*2009 Update: you could reserve the apples and the juices until just a few hours before serving, to save on time.